Recent Changes

Thursday, January 31

  1. page Sample Pages edited ... Ann: “I asked Uncle Jasper to tell me more. I wanted to hear why they were working for the Bri…
    ...
    Ann: “I asked Uncle Jasper to tell me more. I wanted to hear why they were working for the Brightwell family, and what had happened to their parents. He said: “As early as age 2, William had been raised by Richard Brightwell. This was the eldest son of Captain Richard Brightwell, an early official of the colony, who died in 1696, our grandfather. Our mother, Elizabeth, his daughter, had died, and I had been given to her brother, my uncle John, to raise already. I was about six or seven years old. As we grew up, I was not unhappy with Uncle John. We got along fine. William, however, had all kinds of problems living with our uncle Richard. You’ll have to ask your father what he remembers. When William was about thirteen or fourteen, he kept running away from Uncle Richard’s home, and came to be with us at Uncle John’s! He finally was taken in to the county court by Uncle Richard, and they let him choose between Uncle Richard and Uncle John to live with. He chose Uncle John, of course. A short time later, we all moved out to Montgomery County, to Uncle John’s new place. That is where we were when the British navy took us away to war.” I didn’t want to press him too hard. I am so glad he told me this story, but I do want to know more. I’ll have to find a way to ask Father what he remembers.”
    Cyrus Comments: Tax records support that Jasper had likely been living with the younger Brightwell brother, John, because they appear together, in Montgomery County, in the early 1730s. At age 14, in 1733, William appeared in Charles County Court, related to a suit brought by his guardian, Richard Brightwell, against his brother, John Brightwell. The suit indicated that while Richard had provided support for young William, as agreed, William had recently been running off to live with his brother, John, and working on his farm. The court ended up asking William who he wished to live with. He chose John. John then agreed to provide William with two years of schooling, to learn to read and write, and cause him to learn a trade, prior to age 21. It appears likely that William may have wanted to be with his older brother, Jasper, as well as with his favored uncle, the younger brother, John Brightwell, rather than the older Richard Brightwell. It is also likely that William was in a much more subordinated position among the children of Richard than he was among the children of John… as well as being with his own brother, Jasper.
    Friday, June 9, 1775:
    Ann:
    ...
    died when maymy John was
    Cyrus Comments: Here is what I know about these relationships and stories being partially told: Jasper had been married, where he lived in Montgomery Co with the Brightwells, before the war, and had a son, Joseph, born in 1737, that he lost track of during the war and had not since found. About the time of his marriage, to Betsy, Joseph shows up and lives with William and Jasper, for a time, before moving in with his bride’s family in about 1757. Their twin sons, Richard and William, were born early in 1758, followed by Jonathan, late in 1759. Later, another son, George, was born in 1768. Jasper met and married Betsy Askin, and their son, John, was born in 1754. Betsy was a strong woman, and John took on her characteristics. Unfortunately, when John was still a youngster, Betsy became very ill, and died. William met Sarah Ferguson, an Irish girl, who had also been orphaned at a young age and was living as a servant in her uncle’s household. The common link brought them together. In 1754, Anne joined this new family, only a few months after John had arrived to Jasper and Betsy. Jasper and John had continued to live in the household, which was fortunate. Joseph was also living with them, at the time, and helped make life viable, but still very hard. Jasper was able to care for John, and assist with Sarah and Anne, while William and Joseph continued to do the farm labor. They were difficult times, but, as John grew, even as a youngster, he worked hard and learned tasks often not taken on until later in life. Anne, also, was bright and ambitious, and helped out in both mental and physical tasks from a very early age.
    Saturday, June 10, 1775:
    Ann: “Hearing Uncle Jasper talk about the period of time back when John and I were born, it is hard to believe they were able to survive. I asked Father earlier this evening, and he shared some things about those times that I had not heard before.” He said: “After you were born, Sarah and I, and Jasper and Betsy and John, did have quite a tough time of it. Thankfully, Joseph could help some, for a few years, but it was difficult. At the same time, there was great pressure from my friends, to go fight in the war out west! I had tried to be supportive of the local militia, being a veteran of the earlier wars, but there was just no way that I could put forth that energy, barely surviving, physically, for my wife and extended family. Over those years, your mother lost three babies, for example, that we don’t talk about much, because the memory is so painful, even today. None of them survived more than a few days…
    “I know it was very hard for him to talk about, even now, fifteen or so years later. My sister, Milly, was born in 1763, Richard in 1767, John in 1769, and Elizabeth in 1771.”
    Sunday, June,June 11, 1775:
    Ann: “John and I…
    “Uncle Jasper told me today that the colonial soldiers in Massachusetts held their own in the battle at Bunker Hill. There seems to be stronger support for joining the militia and men are responding to the calls for joining the Continental army as well.”
    (view changes)
    6:39 pm

Wednesday, January 30

  1. page Historical Fiction Writing edited ... Historical Research for Fiction Writers Historical Fiction vs. History Six Steps for Writin…
    ...
    Historical Research for Fiction Writers
    Historical Fiction vs. History
    Six Steps for Writing Historical Fiction
    (view changes)
    8:50 pm
  2. page Social History edited ... Website of visit to the site of this story: Visit to Maryland ... Colonial Farm - 1770s M…
    ...
    Website of visit to the site of this story:
    Visit to Maryland
    ...
    Colonial Farm - 1770s Maryland farming (including great photo):
    http://www.accokeek.org/visit/national_colonial_farm

    http://www.accokeek.org

    (view changes)
    8:43 pm

Saturday, May 22

  1. page William Kinnick (Ann's Father) Timeline edited ... April 1719 Birth of William Kinnick || 1721 Jasper Kinnick requested that Richard Bright…
    ...
    April 1719
    Birth of William Kinnick
    ||
    1721
    Jasper Kinnick requested that Richard Brightwell care for his son
    ||
    June 1733
    Petition of Richard Brightwell
    ||
    April 1740
    Jasper and William Kinnick in War of Jenkin’s Ear
    ||
    4 Apr 1752
    Joseph Kinnick as witness in the Charles County Land Record Book
    ||
    1754
    John Kinnick born to Jasper
    ||
    1759
    Ann Kinnick born to William and Sarah
    ||
    1761
    Elizabeth Kinnick born to William and Sarah
    ||
    1764
    Milly Kinnick born to William and Sarch
    ||
    7 May 1764
    Jasper mark recorded in Charles County Deed Book
    ||
    1767
    Richard Kinnick born to William and Sarah
    ||
    12 Jan 1768
    Jasper witnessed a Bill of Sale
    ||
    1769
    John Kinnick born to William and Sarah
    ||
    16 Jan 1775
    Jasper noted as father of John on land sale from George Keith
    ||
    1776
    John and Ann married
    ||
    1778
    John Adam Kinnick born to John and Ann
    ||
    1778
    Joseph Kinnick takes Oath of Allegiance
    ||
    1778
    Jonathan Kinnick is a Private in Major Genas Winslow’s Regiment, Charles Co, MD, in the Archive of Maryland Troops
    ||
    27 May 1779
    Probate record shows money received of Jasper
    ||
    1780
    David R. Kinnick born to John and Ann
    ||
    May 1780
    Jasper signed Oath of Fidelity, in St. Mary’s County
    ||
    1782
    Elizabeth Kinnick born to John and Ann
    ||
    1782-83
    Another William listed in the Tax Lists of Charles County; appears alone, owns no land, assessed a total of 15 shillings. John and Wm also listed.
    ||
    1783
    Jasper subscribes 50 pounds of tobacco at All Faith’s Parish, Saint Mary’s County
    ||
    1784
    George Washington Kinnick born to John and Ann
    ||
    2 Jul 1785
    Jasper listed as “kin” on estate of Wm Kinnick
    ||
    1786
    Susannah Kinnick born to John and Ann
    ||
    24 Jul 1786
    Letters of administration issued to Ann Kinnick, a daughter of Wm
    ||
    27 Oct 1786
    John and Joseph Kinnick listed as “next of kin” on the inventory of Wm
    ||
    1787
    Mary Kinnick born to John and Ann
    ||
    27 Oct 1787
    Ann filed administration account, that listed five children of Wm
    ||
    1789
    Milly Kinnick born to John and Ann, in Maryland
    ||
    1790
    John Kinnick married Mary in Maryland
    ||
    22 Mar 1792
    John Kinnick of Charles County sells land to George Morton of Charles County
    ||
    1793
    William Kinnick born to John and Ann, in the Yadkin valley of North Carolina
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||
    ||

    ||
    (view changes)
    5:50 pm

Sunday, June 29

  1. page Maryland Line edited ... In the latter part of December, the British brig "Symetry" ran aground near Wilmingt…
    ...
    In the latter part of December, the British brig "Symetry" ran aground near Wilmington, and after a few shots from a fieldpiece, surrendered to Smallwood. It contained, besides the wives of several officers, clothing for four British regiments, over one thousand stands of arms and ammunition, pork, butter, wine and other foods and a great deal of baggage of officers. A slooper (sic) was also captured with flour, pork, poultry, and other supplies. These were probably the most valuable prizes of the war, to date.
    Smallwood, in June 1778, left Wilmington and re-joined Washington, who left Valley Forge on the 19th.
    [Interesting note in letter of Washington to Smallwood at Wilmington, related doctor's library on brig Symmetry]
    MONMOUTH, 28 Jun 1778
    On 27 Jun 1778, the British took up a strong position near Monmouth Court House, New Jersey. Major General Charles Lee was given command of Washington's advance corps about five miles distant. Lee, on the morning of the twenty-eighth, was ordered to attack the British rear. After marching five miles, Washington, who was bringing up the main body to support the advance, learned that Lee was retreating, marching his troops directly upon the rear division. Washington rode at once to Lee, whom he accosted with a warmth of language which he rarely used, and ordered him to re-form his division and bring it into immediate action, which Lee promptly did. Washington then asked for an officer to lead a body to check the British advance. Lieutenant Colonel Nathaniel Ramsay, 3rd Maryland, volunteered and held the enemy in check for half an hour. Fighting sword in hand, he fell, pierced with may wounds, and was taken prisoner. The British loss: about five hundred killed and many wounded. The American loss: sixty-nine killed and about one hundred sixty wounded. Maryland casualties, in addition to Lieutenant Colonel Ramsay: killed, Lieutenant Owen Haymond, 6th Regiment... Lieutenant Nathan Williams, 6th Regiment.
    (view changes)
    8:57 pm
  2. page Maryland Line edited ... by Reiman Steuart, Published by the Society of the Cincinnati of Maryland, 1969 In December 1…
    ...
    by Reiman Steuart, Published by the Society of the Cincinnati of Maryland, 1969
    In December 1776, Smallwood was ordered home to raise levies in Maryland and Delaware. This resulted in the seven regiments which became famous as the MARYLAND LINE.
    ...
    the winter. [Jan to May 1777 winter camp]
    STATEN ISLAND, 22 Aug 1777.
    General Smallwood, with four regiments, the 1st Maryland, 2nd Maryland, 3rd Maryland, and 6th Maryland, participated in what is known as Sullivan't Raid, the purpose of which was to capture one thousand Jersey Loyalists. Brigadier General Deborre, with two Maryland Regiments - probably the 4th and the 7th - and a company of New Jersey militia, crossed over to the Island, surprising the enemy, and after a short contest, took several officers and men prisoners. In the darkness of the night, Smallwood's guide made a mistake and led him to the front instead of the rear of the British, who attacked the rear guard left to pick up stragglers. The guard sold itself dearly, but after a vigorous resistance and some losses, it was compelled to surrender. Smallwood lost about two hundred of his best troops. Sullivan brought away from the Island twenty-eight civilians. He was brought before a Court of Inquiry, which said... "General Sullivan's conduct was such that he deserves the approbation of the country and not its censure." In modern parlance, "The operation was a success but the patient died." Maryland casulaties (included): Major Edward Tillard, 6th Regiment.
    (view changes)
    8:27 pm
  3. page Maryland Line edited ... STATEN ISLAND, 22 Aug 1777. General Smallwood, with four regiments, the 1st Maryland, 2nd Mar…
    ...
    STATEN ISLAND, 22 Aug 1777.
    General Smallwood, with four regiments, the 1st Maryland, 2nd Maryland, 3rd Maryland, and 6th Maryland, participated in what is known as Sullivan't Raid, the purpose of which was to capture one thousand Jersey Loyalists. Brigadier General Deborre, with two Maryland Regiments - probably the 4th and the 7th - and a company of New Jersey militia, crossed over to the Island, surprising the enemy, and after a short contest, took several officers and men prisoners. In the darkness of the night, Smallwood's guide made a mistake and led him to the front instead of the rear of the British, who attacked the rear guard left to pick up stragglers. The guard sold itself dearly, but after a vigorous resistance and some losses, it was compelled to surrender. Smallwood lost about two hundred of his best troops. Sullivan brought away from the Island twenty-eight civilians. He was brought before a Court of Inquiry, which said... "General Sullivan's conduct was such that he deserves the approbation of the country and not its censure." In modern parlance, "The operation was a success but the patient died." Maryland casulaties (included): Major Edward Tillard, 6th Regiment.
    ...
    Sep 1777. [Brandywine Battlefield map]
    Having received intelligence that General Howe had embarked nearly his whole force with the object of taking Philadelphia, Washington ordered the whole American Army to the Delaware River. On 22 Aug, Governor Johnson ordered the militia called out - twelve hundred and fifty from the Western Shore under General Smallwood, seven hundred and fifty from the Western Shore under Colonel Mordecai Gist. Under the charge of Colonel Levi Hollingsworth, at the Head of Elk, there was a quantity of stores which he feared would fall in the hands of the enemy. The Delaware militia and Richardson's 5th Maryland had been posted at the Head of Elk and secured the greater part of the stores, but several thousand bushels of grain fell into the hands of the British. Howe landed on 26 Aug and stationed part of his force at Elkton and part at Cecil Court House. The want of horses and the annoyances given by the Cecil and Harford County riflemen under William Paca and the other patriots kept Howe from advancing promptly and gave time for the greater part of the stores to be saved. Howe, on 3 Sep, began his march to Philadelphia, the American Army retreated slowly before him. On 11 Sep, the two forces took up their positions on the banks of the Brandywine Creek about twenty-five miles Southwest of Philadelphia. The Marylanders fought the battle under great disadvantages. Both General Sullivan and Brigadier General DeBorre were unpopular with the men, if not actually disliked by them. Colonel John Hoskins Stone says that only two of all the Maryland Regiments, his 1st Regular and Gist's 3rd Regular, had the opportunity to form. Gist was away in Maryland, as was Smallwood. DeBorre disobeyed orders, and Sullivan, for his bad generalship, was for a short time relieved of his command. The engagement resulted in the loss of three hundred killed six hundred wounded and three or four hundred prisoners. The only Maryland casualties were Captain Benjamin Stoddert, wounded, and Captain Joseph Ford, 1st Regiment, slightly wounded. [The 6th Regiment lost its Sergeant Major]
    [interesting piece on Gen. Gist and timeline]
    (view changes)
    8:22 pm
  4. page Maryland Line edited ... BRANDYWINE, 11 Sep 1777. Having received intelligence that General Howe had embarked nearly h…
    ...
    BRANDYWINE, 11 Sep 1777.
    Having received intelligence that General Howe had embarked nearly his whole force with the object of taking Philadelphia, Washington ordered the whole American Army to the Delaware River. On 22 Aug, Governor Johnson ordered the militia called out - twelve hundred and fifty from the Western Shore under General Smallwood, seven hundred and fifty from the Western Shore under Colonel Mordecai Gist. Under the charge of Colonel Levi Hollingsworth, at the Head of Elk, there was a quantity of stores which he feared would fall in the hands of the enemy. The Delaware militia and Richardson's 5th Maryland had been posted at the Head of Elk and secured the greater part of the stores, but several thousand bushels of grain fell into the hands of the British. Howe landed on 26 Aug and stationed part of his force at Elkton and part at Cecil Court House. The want of horses and the annoyances given by the Cecil and Harford County riflemen under William Paca and the other patriots kept Howe from advancing promptly and gave time for the greater part of the stores to be saved. Howe, on 3 Sep, began his march to Philadelphia, the American Army retreated slowly before him. On 11 Sep, the two forces took up their positions on the banks of the Brandywine Creek about twenty-five miles Southwest of Philadelphia. The Marylanders fought the battle under great disadvantages. Both General Sullivan and Brigadier General DeBorre were unpopular with the men, if not actually disliked by them. Colonel John Hoskins Stone says that only two of all the Maryland Regiments, his 1st Regular and Gist's 3rd Regular, had the opportunity to form. Gist was away in Maryland, as was Smallwood. DeBorre disobeyed orders, and Sullivan, for his bad generalship, was for a short time relieved of his command. The engagement resulted in the loss of three hundred killed six hundred wounded and three or four hundred prisoners. The only Maryland casualties were Captain Benjamin Stoddert, wounded, and Captain Joseph Ford, 1st Regiment, slightly wounded. [The 6th Regiment lost its Sergeant Major]
    ...
    on Gen. Gist]Gist and timeline]
    GERMANTOWN, 4 Oct 1777.
    All seven Maryland Regiments were in the battle along (with) twelve hundred and fifty Maryland militia under Smallwood and seven hundred fifty under Gist. The battle was lost by the want of efficient organization, fog and smoke from the artillery and fires kindled by the British to increase the confusion, and exhaustion of ammunition - forty rounds per man being used up in three hours of incessant combat. Maryland casualties (included) Captain Levin Lawrence, 6th Regiment
    (view changes)
    8:02 pm

More